Flickr/Juhan Sonin

Tech

Black and white and ill all over. Soylent, maker of “food” drinks and bars–that is, “food” in its most basic, nourishment-only, delight-be-damned state–announced on its blog Wednesday that a “small number” of its customers had “experienced gastrointestinal issues after consuming Soylent Bars.”

But much has been made of its (perhaps inadvertent) joyless message: food is difficult, food is a bother, consume this FDA-approved-to-be-labeled-as-“food” food instead.

While the company said it had not yet identified the origin of the issue, it urged customers to discard any remaining bars and said it would immediately halt purchases and shipments of the product.

Sure, the open-source meal replacement born of software engineer Rob Rhinehart’s real food resentments inspired the largest crowdfunded food project in history. But much has been made of its (perhaps inadvertent) joyless message: food is difficult, food is a bother, consume this FDA-approved-to-be-labeled-as-“food” food instead. So maybe this food safety fumble means that, for some observers, schadenfreude tastes better than a salted caramel Soylent Bar.

Kate Cox

Kate Cox covers the secret life of the supply chain as editor for The New Food Economy. In her former life, she was a freelance health reporter for radio and text. Follow her @thekatecox